Brian (digibri) wrote,
Brian
digibri

On the nature of reality (or a couple ways of looking at IT)

The following hodge-podge of tangled thought is probably from a combination of watching "What the BLEEP Do We Know", and re-reading ZAMM again. Any tangential simularity to actual reality is most likely entirely coincidental. Of course, if one doesn't believe in coincidence, then things
could be slightly more interesting...


If...
Our experience of the world is a result of a combination of both (an event or something "external" happening) and our resulting reaction or response to that event.

And...
Our experience is not only the (thing, or event, or object, or external something), nor is it purely within our minds. It is when our minds (or awareness) reacts/responds to 'things as they are'* that our experience/reality is born.

Then...
In some manner, we are responsible for our experience.

So...
By both training our awareness to more simply focus on 'things as they are', and by increasing our awareness of our responses/reactions we can change how we filter/focus/create/manifest the manner in which we experience our reality.




On the other hand (or perhaps on another level entirely), the magnificent unified 'things as they are' includes our minds. So the cutting edge of experience occurs/exists not as a result of where our awareness responds to 'things as they are', but as a result of this wonderful unified 'things as they are' becoming aware of and responding to itself.

This way of interpreting reality is much subtler and (I find) far more difficult to grasp. I feel that I can understand it somewhat on a purely intellectual level, but realize that this is a concept that can't be truely grasped on a purely intellectual level. I realize that this can only be fully understood by a manner of consciousness other than that which is most common within the realm of human experience.





* The phrase 'things as they are' is taken from Shunryu Suzuki in "Not Only So". It seems to suggest the inherent unity of existance as a singular. "Things" seems to refer to our most common perception that there are many individual or independant or separate bits.

B.
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